RNC issues new demands to NBC

WASHINGTON (MEDIA GENERAL) – Less than a week after several GOP Presidential hopefuls criticized a debate hosted by CNBC, the candidates are banding together to require new rules for debates going forward, and we’re looking at the controversial questions word-for-word.

New demands

A memo released on Monday, obtained by the Washington Post, showed the 15 remaining GOP candidates are demanding new rules which they think will prevent future arguments with moderators and debate organizers. Among the suggestions, candidates shouldn’t be required to raise their hands, not be asked ask yes/no questions, and no longer be committed to lightning rounds. The requests are detailed and even address the temperature inside the debate auditorium, requesting the temperature be kept below 67 degrees.

On Friday, the Republican National Committee suspended their partnership with NBC News for a debate in February 2016. NBC released a statement on Friday promising to try and repair the relationship between the network and the RNC.

“This is a disappointing development. However, along with our debate broadcast partners at Telemundo we will work in good faith to resolve this matter with the Republican Party.” said Ali Zelenko of NBC News.

Objectionable questions word-for-word

By now, you’ve probably heard about the objectionable questions from CNBC. But, have you seen the exact questions that raised such ire? We broke down the debate complaint by complaint.

This was the sound bite played everywhere. So, let’s take these one-by-one and show you what was said word-for-word.

#1 “Donald Trump, are you a comic book villain?

Donald Trump makes a point during the CNBC Republican presidential debate at the University of Colorado, Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2015, in Boulder, Colo. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)
Donald Trump makes a point during the CNBC Republican presidential debate at the University of Colorado, Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2015, in Boulder, Colo. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

Here’s verbatim of what was actually asked:

John Harwood, CNBC Business News moderator, asked Donald Trump:

“Mr. Trump you’ve done very well in this campaign so far by promising to build a wall and make another country pay for it, send 11 million people out of the country, cut taxes 10 trillion dollars without increasing the deficit, and make Americans better off because your greatness would replace the stupidity and incompetence of others.”

Donald Trump: “That’s right.”

Harwood: “Let’s be honest, is this a comic book version of a presidential campaign?”

Trump: “It’s not a comic book version and it’s not a very nicely asked question the way you say that.”

#2 “Ben Carson, can you do math?”

Republican presidential candidate, retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson speaks during the CNBC Republican presidential debate at the University of Colorado, Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2015, in Boulder, Colo. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)
Republican presidential candidate, retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson speaks during the CNBC Republican presidential debate at the University of Colorado, Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2015, in Boulder, Colo. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

Here’s verbatim of what was actually asked:

Becky Quick, CNBC moderator: “Dr. Carson, let’s talk about taxes. You have a flat tax plan of 10 percent flat taxes. And I’ve looked at it, and this is something that is very appealing to a lot of voters, but I’ve had a really tough time trying to make the math work on this.

If you were to take a 10 percent tax with the numbers right now on total personal income, you’re going to come in with bringing in $1-1/2 trillion. That is less than half of what we billed bringing in right now.

And, by the way, it’s going to leave us in a $2 trillion hole. So what analysis got you to the point where you think this will work?”

#3 “John Kasich, will you insult two people over here?”

Republican presidential candidate Ohio Gov. John Kasich speaks to members of the media after the CNBC Republican presidential debate Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2015, at the Coors Event Center on the University of Colorado campus in Boulder, Colo. (Jeremy Papasso/Daily Camera via AP) NO SALES; MANDATORY CREDIT
Republican presidential candidate Ohio Gov. John Kasich speaks to members of the media after the CNBC Republican presidential debate Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2015, at the Coors Event Center on the University of Colorado campus in Boulder, Colo. (Jeremy Papasso/Daily Camera via AP) NO SALES; MANDATORY CREDIT

Here’s verbatim of what was actually asked:

John Harwood (to John Kasich): “Well, let’s just get more pointed about it. You said yesterday that you were hearing proposals that were just crazy from your colleagues. Who were you talking about?”

#4 “Marco Rubio, why don’t you resign?”

Marco Rubio, right, and Jeb Bush, argue a point during the CNBC Republican presidential debate at the University of Colorado, Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2015, in Boulder, Colo. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)
Marco Rubio, right, and Jeb Bush, argue a point during the CNBC Republican presidential debate at the University of Colorado, Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2015, in Boulder, Colo. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

Here’s verbatim of what was actually asked:

Carl Quintanilla (to Marco Rubio): “So when the Sun-Sentinel says Rubio should resign, not rip us off, when they say Floridians sent you to Washington to do a job, when they say you act like you hate your job, do you?”

#5 “Jeb Bush, why have your numbers fallen?”

Jeb Bush, center, stands with Mike Huckabee, left, and Marco Rubio during the CNBC Republican presidential debate at the University of Colorado, Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2015, in Boulder, Colo. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)
Jeb Bush, center, stands with Mike Huckabee, left, and Marco Rubio during the CNBC Republican presidential debate at the University of Colorado, Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2015, in Boulder, Colo. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

Here’s verbatim of what was actually asked:

John Harwood: “Governor, the fact that you’re at the fifth lectern tonight shows how far your stock has fallen in this race, despite the big investment your donors have made. You noted recently after slashing your payroll that you had better things to do than sit around and be demonized by other people.”

Jeb Bush: “No, no, no. What I said was, I don’t believe that I would be President of the United States and have the same dysfunction that exists in Washington, D.C., now. Don’t vote for me if you want to keep the gridlock in Washington, D.C., but if you want someone who has a proven, effective leadership that was a governor of a state that transformed the culture there, elect me so I can fight for the American people and change the culture in Washington, D.C.”

Harwood: “Okay. It’s a question about why you’re having difficulty. I want to ask you in this context. Ben Bernanke, who was appointed Fed chairman by your brother, recently wrote a book in which he said he no longer considers himself a Republican because the Republican party has given in to know-nothingism.

Is that why you’re having a difficult time in this race?”

#6 “Fantasy football”

This discussion received a lot of play as well. Literally. Here’s exactly what was said.

Carl Quintanilla: “Governor Bush, daily fantasy sports has become a phenomenon in this country. They will award billions of dollars in prize money this year. But to play, you have to assess your odds, put money at risk, wait for an outcome that’s out of your control.

Isn’t that the definition of gambling, and should the federal government treat it as such?”

Chris Christie: “Carl, are we really talking about getting the government involved in fantasy football?

Wait a second. We have $19 trillion in debt, we have people out of work, we have ISIS and Al-Qaeda attacking us, and we’re talking about fantasy football?”

In his closing statements, Ben Carson took his opportunity to say, “I just want to thank all my colleagues for being civil, not falling for the traps. And I just also want to thank the audience for being attentive and noticing the questions and noticing the answers.”

Next debate

The next republican debate is scheduled for November 10th in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The new format requests are not expected to be implemented for the next debate hosted by the FOX Business network.

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